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Regional geography

Volume |

Delineation of rural-urban fringe: a case study of Uluberia municipality, Haora district, India

Abstract: In India, most urban centres are expanding very rapidly both spatially and demographically. This expansion refuels the process of urbanization and spreads urban characteristics to peripheral regions. As a result, the rapid growth and expansion of urban areas to its surrounding rural hinterlands fosters unplanned and haphazard development and makes the area even more complex. Over time, the distinction between rural and urban gradually disappears, so that a new type of structure would emerge in city outskirts which is characterized by mixed forms of land-use, socio-economic activities and termed as rural-urban fringe. The paper delineates rural-urban fringe of Uluberia municipality based on selected indicators of demographic structure and economic services. Urbanity Index and Composite Urbanity Index have been used for the delineation of rural-urban fringe. Four fringe zones of Uluberia municipality have been identified and termed by applying the Mean±Standard Deviation technique.

Volume |

Status of housing condition, household amenities and assets in rural-urban fringe of Faizabad city, India

Abstract: The main aim of this paper is to examine the effect of urbanization on housing conditions and access to basic amenities in rural urban fringe of Faizabad city. Food, clothing and shelter are the basic needs for the survival of human beings. Although food and clothing have their own importance, however, the need of better housing conditions cannot be ignored. The inadequacy of housing conditions affects the quality of life and social well-being. Rural- urban fringe generally has unique characteristics. The mixture zone is characterized by both traditional and new houses with all facilities. This study is mainly based on secondary sources of data collected from the village directory and housing listing tables from the census of India. The paper reveals that the overall better housing conditions and housing amenities exist only in primary fringe. Thus, this paper suggests some remedial measures for improving the overall housing conditions in rural-urban fringe of Faizabad city.

Volume XVIII |

Romanian born population residing in Hungary, 2011-2017

Abstract: Foreign citizens began to immigrate to Hungary following its democratic transformation. Ethnicity had a decisive role during this period: mostly people with Hungarian nationality arrived. Later, following Hungary’s accession to the European Union, global trends had an impact on the Hungarian migration networks: Hungary’s migratory source extended, and it was able to attract foreign citizens from greater distances.
Thus, two levels of international migration to Hungary are markedly separated: the impact of global migration and the movements from the countries of the Carpathian Basin to Hungary. Within Europe, the primary weight of neighbouring countries is linked to cross-border linguistic and culture relations. International migration to Hungary is characterised by short distances, and the majority of the immigrant population has Hungarian nationality or is native speaker of Hungarian.
Most immigrants to Hungary are arriving from Romania, so the aim of the article is to analyse the social, economic and demographic characteristics of the migrants according to their areas of birth.
Migration flows between the two countries have been territorially concentrated; one quarter of the movements between 2011 and 2017 took place between Central Hungary and the Central Romanian Development Region. In the choice of the new place of residence, in addition to the economic centre areas border regions also play an important role, which can partly be explained by the phenomenon of circular migration, and partly by the easier interaction with those family members who have remained home.

Volume XVIII |

Analysis of geographic hierarchy from attributes of local government area in Nigeria

Abstract: Natural events and entities often create structure and as such exhibits scaling in their organisation in space and over time. Hierarchy is a common feature of natural and social systems. Analysis of the hierarchy could support a better understanding of the structure and the function of different places across a landscape, thus, informing better policy and interventions for sustainable development. The study examined the hierarchy in selected data at local government authorities (LGA) level. Population, road network, and boundary data were sourced, processed and analysed within ArcGIS Software to confirm agreement or otherwise with Zipf’s law and showcase the structure formed by these attributes across the LGAs in Nigeria. Head-tail break was adopted to identify the hierarchy within the datasets. Results showed that population, area, population density, and road density exhibits scaling. For population, area, population density, and road density there are 6, 5,4 and 3 classes across the LGAs. These classes represent natural and dynamic classification which are rooted in the data. Evidently, the results clearly indicate that there are more classes than the usually dichotomous classification which reinforces dualism in development. The geographic hierarchy formed by these properties gave an insight into the socio-eco-political landscape revealing the unsustainable pattern of development across the country. In conclusion, using natural classification rooted in empirical data is suggested as a better way to classify authorities thereby enhancing discussion in policy formulation to address such inequalities evident in hierarchy currently established.

Volume XVII |

Post-communist Romanian migration patterns: dynamics and territorial perspectives

Abstract: The paper addresses a problem of great importance for Romania, that of the international migration that is in a continuous process of exacerbation after the collapse of the communist regime, but with important spatial differences. The analysis of the situation has led to the need for a series of spatial representations to highlight the typology and structure of migratory flows across the country in the post-communist period, as well as changes in direction or intensity. In almost three decades, more than 550,000 people emigrated from Romania, while almost 240,000 were temporarily abroad in 2017, according to official statistics, but in fact, their number is much higher. The international migration of Romanians has particular characteristics, with four distinct periods, characterized by demographic characteristics and specific territorial distribution. Overall, a mutation of emigrant areas from the west and centre of the country is noticeable after the fall of communism to the eastern and southern regions in recent years, with predominant involvement of young adults.