fg

Human and economic geography

Volume |

Status of housing condition, household amenities and assets in rural-urban fringe of Faizabad city, India

Abstract: The main aim of this paper is to examine the effect of urbanization on housing conditions and access to basic amenities in rural urban fringe of Faizabad city. Food, clothing and shelter are the basic needs for the survival of human beings. Although food and clothing have their own importance, however, the need of better housing conditions cannot be ignored. The inadequacy of housing conditions affects the quality of life and social well-being. Rural- urban fringe generally has unique characteristics. The mixture zone is characterized by both traditional and new houses with all facilities. This study is mainly based on secondary sources of data collected from the village directory and housing listing tables from the census of India. The paper reveals that the overall better housing conditions and housing amenities exist only in primary fringe. Thus, this paper suggests some remedial measures for improving the overall housing conditions in rural-urban fringe of Faizabad city.

Volume XVIII |

Romanian born population residing in Hungary, 2011-2017

Abstract: Foreign citizens began to immigrate to Hungary following its democratic transformation. Ethnicity had a decisive role during this period: mostly people with Hungarian nationality arrived. Later, following Hungary’s accession to the European Union, global trends had an impact on the Hungarian migration networks: Hungary’s migratory source extended, and it was able to attract foreign citizens from greater distances.
Thus, two levels of international migration to Hungary are markedly separated: the impact of global migration and the movements from the countries of the Carpathian Basin to Hungary. Within Europe, the primary weight of neighbouring countries is linked to cross-border linguistic and culture relations. International migration to Hungary is characterised by short distances, and the majority of the immigrant population has Hungarian nationality or is native speaker of Hungarian.
Most immigrants to Hungary are arriving from Romania, so the aim of the article is to analyse the social, economic and demographic characteristics of the migrants according to their areas of birth.
Migration flows between the two countries have been territorially concentrated; one quarter of the movements between 2011 and 2017 took place between Central Hungary and the Central Romanian Development Region. In the choice of the new place of residence, in addition to the economic centre areas border regions also play an important role, which can partly be explained by the phenomenon of circular migration, and partly by the easier interaction with those family members who have remained home.

Volume XVII |

Post-communist Romanian migration patterns: dynamics and territorial perspectives

Abstract: The paper addresses a problem of great importance for Romania, that of the international migration that is in a continuous process of exacerbation after the collapse of the communist regime, but with important spatial differences. The analysis of the situation has led to the need for a series of spatial representations to highlight the typology and structure of migratory flows across the country in the post-communist period, as well as changes in direction or intensity. In almost three decades, more than 550,000 people emigrated from Romania, while almost 240,000 were temporarily abroad in 2017, according to official statistics, but in fact, their number is much higher. The international migration of Romanians has particular characteristics, with four distinct periods, characterized by demographic characteristics and specific territorial distribution. Overall, a mutation of emigrant areas from the west and centre of the country is noticeable after the fall of communism to the eastern and southern regions in recent years, with predominant involvement of young adults.

Volume XVII |

An evaluation of the human resources potential of the Western Region (Romania)

Abstract: The data analysed in the present study show that the human resources potential of the Western Region is limited in nature and characterised by disparities that are multidimensional from both the quantitative and the qualitative point of view. When we consider the region in terms of its administrative sub-units, we find areas that have human resources that are surplus to requirements but insufficiently developed and structurally unbalanced (Hunedoara county), others with high-quality but numerically limited human resources and with great potential for attracting them from other areas (Arad and Timiş counties) and a case of an area whose human resources are both insufficiently developed and deficient from a quantitative point of view (Caraş-Severin county).

Volume XVI |

Delineation of rural-urban fringe: a case study of Aligarh city

Abstract: Cities are dependent on their surroundings for their existence and growth. Having a rapidly increasing population, a city needs a huge amount of agricultural products for its sustenance. To a considerable extent, it depends on countryside for the supply of vegetables, milk, food-grains, fruits and labour. These commodities are not only brought from immediate surroundings but also from hundreds of miles away. Thus, the city covers a huge area of surroundings for getting their agricultural products. The frequency and intensity of services depends on linkages in terms of distance of a city with its countryside and the available nature of transport and communication. The characteristics and socio-economic development of a fringe differ from that of another. People do their recurring commuting to perform their daily activities and jobs from the margins of a city to its central part, where their offices and institutions are generally located. The villagers also travel daily to cater their socio-economic needs to neighboring towns and cities. Thus, cities work as centres of gravity for socio-economic, cultural and administrative activities which are truly representative of the countryside.
Aligarh city performs a variety of functions. It provides a number of services to its countryside i.e., health services, educational services, banking services and bus services and in return of which it receives some services from its surrounding areas i.e., supply of agricultural products and daily labour. The information on the basis of which the fringe zones has been delimited, have been collected through surveys and records maintained by the colleges and schools, telephone offices, commuters’ assembling points, banks, mandis and milk collection points. The five sets of determinants for delineating the rural urban fringe of the Aligarh city are spatial, economic services, occupational structure and demographic and housing character. Our main conclusion is that the expansion of the city mainly has a north and north-east direction, especially along bypass and national highways.