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Regional geography

Volume XVIII |

Romanian born population residing in Hungary, 2011-2017

Abstract: Foreign citizens began to immigrate to Hungary following its democratic transformation. Ethnicity had a decisive role during this period: mostly people with Hungarian nationality arrived. Later, following Hungary’s accession to the European Union, global trends had an impact on the Hungarian migration networks: Hungary’s migratory source extended, and it was able to attract foreign citizens from greater distances.
Thus, two levels of international migration to Hungary are markedly separated: the impact of global migration and the movements from the countries of the Carpathian Basin to Hungary. Within Europe, the primary weight of neighbouring countries is linked to cross-border linguistic and culture relations. International migration to Hungary is characterised by short distances, and the majority of the immigrant population has Hungarian nationality or is native speaker of Hungarian.
Most immigrants to Hungary are arriving from Romania, so the aim of the article is to analyse the social, economic and demographic characteristics of the migrants according to their areas of birth.
Migration flows between the two countries have been territorially concentrated; one quarter of the movements between 2011 and 2017 took place between Central Hungary and the Central Romanian Development Region. In the choice of the new place of residence, in addition to the economic centre areas border regions also play an important role, which can partly be explained by the phenomenon of circular migration, and partly by the easier interaction with those family members who have remained home.

Volume XVIII |

Analysis of geographic hierarchy from attributes of local government area in Nigeria

Abstract: Natural events and entities often create structure and as such exhibits scaling in their organisation in space and over time. Hierarchy is a common feature of natural and social systems. Analysis of the hierarchy could support a better understanding of the structure and the function of different places across a landscape, thus, informing better policy and interventions for sustainable development. The study examined the hierarchy in selected data at local government authorities (LGA) level. Population, road network, and boundary data were sourced, processed and analysed within ArcGIS Software to confirm agreement or otherwise with Zipf’s law and showcase the structure formed by these attributes across the LGAs in Nigeria. Head-tail break was adopted to identify the hierarchy within the datasets. Results showed that population, area, population density, and road density exhibits scaling. For population, area, population density, and road density there are 6, 5,4 and 3 classes across the LGAs. These classes represent natural and dynamic classification which are rooted in the data. Evidently, the results clearly indicate that there are more classes than the usually dichotomous classification which reinforces dualism in development. The geographic hierarchy formed by these properties gave an insight into the socio-eco-political landscape revealing the unsustainable pattern of development across the country. In conclusion, using natural classification rooted in empirical data is suggested as a better way to classify authorities thereby enhancing discussion in policy formulation to address such inequalities evident in hierarchy currently established.

Volume XVII |

Post-communist Romanian migration patterns: dynamics and territorial perspectives

Abstract: The paper addresses a problem of great importance for Romania, that of the international migration that is in a continuous process of exacerbation after the collapse of the communist regime, but with important spatial differences. The analysis of the situation has led to the need for a series of spatial representations to highlight the typology and structure of migratory flows across the country in the post-communist period, as well as changes in direction or intensity. In almost three decades, more than 550,000 people emigrated from Romania, while almost 240,000 were temporarily abroad in 2017, according to official statistics, but in fact, their number is much higher. The international migration of Romanians has particular characteristics, with four distinct periods, characterized by demographic characteristics and specific territorial distribution. Overall, a mutation of emigrant areas from the west and centre of the country is noticeable after the fall of communism to the eastern and southern regions in recent years, with predominant involvement of young adults.

Volume XVI |

The development of education in the rural areas in the post economic crisis period. Case Study: Argeș county, Romania

Abstract: Education is the main pillar of any society, both worldwide and in Romania. The paper analyzes the evolution of the educational system in the rural areas from the county of Argeș during the crisis period and also after the financial crisis. The study has been based on statistical evidence data and also on the data provided by the Ministry of Regional Development, European Funds and Public Administration. The analysis has been applied on 95 communes, which form rural area in the county of Argeș. In addition to the educational variables, the study also took into account social and economic indicators in order to obtain a greater veracity over the analysis. In the methodological approach the article uses the principal components analysis and the hierarchical ascendant classification analysis, taking into consideration the year of 2010 and the year of 2016. The analysis points to the fact that the villages close to Pitesti stands out, as these are more developed. They are followed closely by the category represented by the villages with an aging population, from where the majority of the young workforce has emigrated. Another category is represented by the villages which have their economy based on the primary sector, and the last category is the one containing the villages with a disadvantaged ethnic population.

Volume XVI |

Measuring the Complex Socio-economic Development of the Danube-adjacent NUTS2 Regions

Abstract: The existing inner socio-economic discrepancies are one of the major stumbling-blocks to the sustainable development of the Danube region and to the successful realization of its different macro-regional development programmes, strategies, and action plans. That is why it is of extreme importance to assess these discrepancies on a complex base, going beyond the analysis of single indicators. From that point of view, we suggest that sophisticated methodology and approach are needed, similar to those used to elaborate thorough European spatial development models. In order to measure the current socio-economic spatial development of the Danube regions on a complex basis, we apply author’s “Development and Prosperity Index” (DPI) calculated by using the latest available data for 8 key indicators. By contrast with the majority of the scientific studies that build their conclusions on NUTS0, or rarely on NUTS1 level analysis, our research is suited at NUTS2 level so that we can take a detailed picture of the situation in the Danube region. Another significant difference from the mainstream studies is that we concentrate predominantly on the Danube-adjacent NUTS2 regions, but not on the whole area (as defined in the EU Danube Region Strategy). That approach provides us with an opportunity to divide the study in two important stages. Firstly, we make a comparative analysis and a classification of the Danube-adjacent NUTS2 regions providing empirical evidence for the significant complex socio-economic discrepancies between them. Secondly, in a view to estimate the development role of Danube in different countries, we confront the DPI results for Danube-adjacent NUTS2 regions against those for the other regions in a given country. Although this approach is characterized with certain conditionality considering that development is a function of many diverse factors, the results of the study provide solid ground for building up adequate future policies.