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Volume XVII |

Study of Landscape Evolution in North Koel River Basin, Jharkhand, India: Tectonic and Structural Implications Based on Hypsometric Analysis

Abstract: Hypsometry is widely used for inferring tectonic effects and erosion status of landscapes. Tectonics, structural inhomogeneity, lithologic differences, and climatic variations lead to topographic undulations discerned into discrepancies in the values. Hypsometric index (and curve), indicative of frequency distribution of proportional elevation with the respective proportional area, is used as a tool to describe characteristics of landscape morphology, lithological variability, and degree of fluvial dissection. Many workers have used to infer comparison of rates of erosion with tectonic uplift rates. However, there are many other factors reported to influence topographic undulations other than tectonics which lead to a variety of hypsometries. Morphotectonic index, hypsometric integral, calculated using digital elevation models (DEMs) in GIS environment has been widely used for inferring tectonic effects, status of erosion, and structural controls. The present study is conducted in the North Koel River basin. This river rises in the Ranchi plateau and joins the Son River a few miles north-west of Haidarnagar, is the right bank tributary of the Son River. Along its entire course of flow, North Koel river (260 km) flows through plateau region mostly formed of metamorphic rocks. Hence, structural control seems to be the primary control on the landscape evolution of this sub-basin. In this study, hypsometric integral (and curve) has been calculated for third order and upper order streams to look whether this morphotectonic index shows any sign of tectonic, structural, or lithologic control on the landscape evolution in the North Koel River basin.

Volume XVII |

Application of Wireless Sensor Networks in Flood Detection and River Pollution Monitoring

Abstract: In this paper, we propose a system for river monitoring based on wireless sensor network (WSN) technology. This system consists of sensor nodes that periodically measure several environmental parameters such as flow rate, water level, rainfall and pollution level. Each type of sensor node has two threshold values and measured data is compared with them at the end of the reporting interval. Based on the current situation in WSN and measured data velocity sensors can use three different frequencies of reporting. Simulation of river monitoring system is done using Matlab software tool and the results of river mainte-nance during one WSN life cycle are presented. Two possi-ble hierarchical system architectures are considered and their performance is compared. The optimal system archi-tecture for this WSN application is discussed based on the obtained results.

Volume XVII |

The impact of human activities on the environment in the Romanați Plain (Romania), during the postcommunist era

Abstract: The purpose of the article is to present the impact of human activities on natural landscapes in the Romanati Plain. With the change of the communist regime, the form of ownership of the land has changed due to the disappearance of agricultural cooperatives. This has led to land breaking and changing the way it is used. By ccalculating some human environmental pressure indicators, based on statistical data, maps were made using GIS programs, which were then compared and interpreted, thus following the evolution of anthropic environmental impact during the period 1992-2017.

Volume XVII |

Modelling intact forest landscapes habitats quality at global scales through the use of landscape ecology methods

Abstract: Modelling intact forest landscapes (IFL) quality as habitats for various species represents a crucial aspect concerning wildlife conservation. Landscape ecology provides a rice pallet of metrics suitable for quantifying complex relationships between landscapes structure and function. Our research aims to conduct an ecological diagnosis of the 2013 non-altered IFL patches as optimal habitats for both edge and interior preferring species by taking into account their spatial adjacency to altered IFL patches by fire related and non-fire related causes between 2003 and 2013 through the use of the Edge Contrast Index Metric and the Core Area Index Metric. Our results evidence that none of the world geographical forest regions suffered potential ecological dysfunctions as habitats for either interior or edge dwelling species. However, the equatorial forest zones of Africa, America and Asia are characterized by alarming low levels of habitat quality which in the future can generate severe malfunctions.

Volume XVII |

The connection between sustainable tourism and certification systems

Abstract: The subject of certification and standards is vast, complex and at the same time topical, so the best is to begin by clarifying the terms. A “standard” by definition is a set of guidelines that helps organizations to develop, manage and control everything, from processes and products to services and systems. These guidelines meet specific requirements in areas such as efficiency, quality and safety. On the other hand, the certification is the process that verifies whether an organization, product or tourist service meets the specific standards of providing a written guarantee (the commercial logo), the latter representing a good way to allow customers to identify products that deliver higher quality service levels. At the same time, it participates in increasing the confidence in ecotourism products both nationally and internationally, but also in promoting the concept and principles of ecotourism at local, regional and national level; it contributes to the sustainable achievement of destinations and to the growth of shared knowledge with regard to a certification system, resulting in the benefits brought by it. In order to certify an organization, product or tourist service that meets certain standards, accredited third-party certification bodies must verify that the requirements are met through an audit process. Only after the successful completion of the audit process, an official certificate of an organization can be issued, and the admitted company agrees to maintain the systems according to the standard requirements of the continuous improvement. But why do you need to submit to the certification process activity and to all its expenses? What are the benefits of a company or its customers? The third-party certification shows to current and potential customers that an organization is committed to quality and has taken enough time to build and maintain a culture in its processes to give customers the same thing, i.e. the quality of the travel product.